Nothing is the colour we think it is

The sky isn’t blue or the grass isn’t green or the banana isn’t yellow or the sea isn’t light blue or the snow isn’t white. That is only how our mind sees things through its conditioning of what colours things are, it comes from school and early years.

The same thing with how we see people too. We label them and then we do not see them as they really are, we see them as the label and the judgement that goes with the label.

They speak and we do not hear them, the walk past and we instantly react within to them, a stranger that we’ve never met. We experience fear even based on what they might be wearing.

If we stop and just observe without engaging our mind, we actually see and we do not label or react. Then we realise that nothing is the colour we think, or the person, or event, that the label we created it to be.

Imagine a life where we actually saw…reality.

You are a lair

If we label someone, we are branding them, we are damning them to a role or story that gives them not just shame but little room for change. It’s easy though as the mind needs to box everyone up, so it can instantly compare and judge them with ourselves and others.

If we say ‘you are a liar’ it is very different to saying ‘you made a wrong choice to tell a lie’. The second option does not judge them or label them as a liar, it is just us voicing our view of their choice.

Our society is driven by our mind and the collective mind’s need to label and blame others. It is a way of us being superior.

We may choose to offer a view of another person’s decision or choice but to label and judge is not for us to decide. No one is a liar, or unkind or hateful or whatever the label…they just make choices at that moment some we may see as good and some as bad, but that is subjective and depends on perspective.

If we accept others as they are and choose not to judge, that still leaves us a place to comment on their choice of behaviour towards us, without us suffering within from their behaviour, and it comes from a place of not judging them as a person. This allows the other person to be free from shame and labelling.